Kovar & Associates, LLC | BLOG
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Getting accurate information to investigators in a timely manner is critical in most investigations, and this is true in UAV investigations as well. Using URSA we can generate this type of report from any DJI onboard flight log (FLYxxx.DAT), any DJI app log (e.g. DJI Go), and any PixHawk flight controller log. The exact contents and layout can be tuned to a particular investigator's needs and custom reports can be developed. This report is designed to provide the investigator with a quick snapshot of critical information in a standardized, repeatable form. Through other tools, the investigator can conduct a much deeper dive into the flight data, identify linkages with other flight data in the system, and develop leads to drive investigations in the physical world such as requests to locate batteries, controllers, cell phones, and information about locations. At the present time this is available as a service only while we work on...

UAV lawnmower pattern Image courtesy of Jarlath O’Neil-Dunne, Director of the University of Vermont Spatial Analysis Laboratory. Appeared in Vol.5 No.5 of LIDAR Magazine I've been talking about the potential risks of an adversary gaining access to your UAV data for awhile. People are most concerned about their sensor data, the actual imagery or chemical levels or whatever the sensor is collecting. Yes, this is very valuable data but it is relatively easy to determine if it is being exfiltrated surreptitiously  due to the bandwidth required to move it and due to the fact that the normal logging mechanisms generally do not make it accessible to the vendor's application or on board flight systems. (DJI Go does store image thumbnails in its logs. You knew that, right?) During these conversations I often point out that the telemetry information may pose a greater risk. Why? It is much more compact. The launch point alone...

UAV forensics extracts a wealth of valuable data about UAVs, the flights they took, how the operator managed the UAV, and much more. Unfortunately, that information is often extremely dense and hard to comprehend quickly. Our system is designed to overcome that hurdle through integration with other tools. Let's use flight paths for example - what, exactly, was the UAV flying over, and at what height? We can inject a static model into reports and clients:   This is useful, but still limited. A more powerful representation is a fly-through 3D model such as the one produced by Eric Kant: [vc_video link='https://youtu.be/QDULWqJWMpA'] Forensic tools and processes extract the flight data and then 3D modeling presents it as a fly-through model. Further modeling can incorporate gimbal information from the UAV along with camera specifications to show exactly what the UAV could see at any moment in time. Success depends on accurate data extraction and analysis along with...